Cholesterol

1) How long does it take to schedule a new patient appointment for a patient with abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Typically only a couple of days. If you pay out of pocket we can see you the next business day. If you want to use your insurance it may take 3-5 days.

2) Do you accept new patients for evaluation and treatment of abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Yes, we do. We ask to bring available blood tests from other providers and a current regiment of medications.

3) Do you do a routine screen for abnormal levels of cholesterol in the office?

Yes, we do. You need to fast over-night or about 8 hours. We get the blood from a finger prick and your result is ready in 5 minutes.

4) Can I transfer genes responsible for abnormal levels of cholesterol to my children?

Yes, abnormal levels of cholesterol may be genetically predetermined and may run in the families.

5) What is the most common cause of abnormal levels of cholesterol?

It depends on the type of the disease. Primary elevation of bad cholesterol as well as low levels of good cholesterol are usually genetic. Elevated triglycerides may be due to poor dietary habits, uncontrolled diabetes or obesity.

6) Who is mostly affected by abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Elderly patients with hypertension, diabetes, morbid obesity, cigarette smokers, family history of coronary artery disease, and/or sedentary lifestyle.

7) What are the most common consequences of high bad cholesterol, low good cholesterol, and elevated triglycerides?

In combination with other factors such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, family history of heart attacks it increases the risk for heart attacks, strokes, peripheral vascular disease, and pancreatitis to name a few.

8) Is life expectancy affected by abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Absolutely, abnormal levels of cholesterol may contribute to premature development of coronary artery disease and early heart attack. The risk may be calculated by using Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score, as one example.

9) What is the best course of action for patients with abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Early detection of the problem is quintessential in the successful outcome of management for this condition. Modification of the risk factors, appropriate changes of the lifestyle and treatment are the key factors to the success in dealing with this problem.

10) What are the common side effects of pharmacological treatment for abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Most patients experience no side effects. Occasionally muscle aches indicate inflammatory damage in the muscle tissue and require urgent medical attention.

11) What are the non-pharmacological treatment options for abnormal levels of cholesterol?

Aerobic exercise, special diet, treatment of underlying problems such as poorly controlled diabetes or low functioning thyroid, smoking cessation, and weight loss.

12) How frequently do you typically need to follow up after cholesterol goals have been achieved via lifestyle modification or medications?

On average about 3-4 times a year depending on your comfort level. Your liver enzymes need to be periodically checked and medications readjusted if you are able to achieve the desired weight loss.

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